Identity Theft Red Flags (Regulation V) (2022)

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Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

Final rule.

The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System is amending its rule on identity theft “red flags” (“Red Flags rule”), which implements section 615(e) of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The Red Flag Program Clarification Act of 2010 (the Clarification Act) added a definition of “creditor” in FCRA section 615(e) that is specific to section 615(e). Accordingly, the final rule amends the definition of “creditor” in the Red Flags rule to reflect the definition of that term as added by the Clarification Act. The final rule also updates a cross-reference in the Red Flags rule to reflect a statutory change in rulemaking authority.

The final rule is effective June 30, 2014.

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Mandie K. Aubrey, Counsel, Division of Consumer and Community Affairs, at (202) 452-3667, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 20th and C Streets NW., Washington, DC 20551. For users of Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) only, contact (202) 263-4869.

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I. Background

On November 9, 2007, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board), along with the other banking agencies,[1] National Credit Union Administration (NCUA), and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) (collectively, the “Agencies”), published final rules and guidelines on identity theft “red flags” (“Red Flags rule”) to implement section 615(e) of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) (15 U.S.C. 1681m(e)).[2] The Red Flags rule requires each financial institution and creditor that holds any consumer account, or other account for which there is a reasonably foreseeable risk of identity theft, to develop and implement an identity theft prevention program in connection with new and existing accounts. The program must include reasonable policies and procedures for detecting, preventing, and mitigating identity theft. The Agencies also issued guidelines to assist financial institutions and creditors in developing and implementing a program, including a supplement that provides examples of red flags.

The Red Flags rule, implemented in the Board's Regulation V, Subpart J, defines the terms “credit” and “creditor” by cross-reference to FCRA section 603(r)(5). 15 U.S.C. 1681a(r)(5). Section 603(r)(5) defines the terms “credit” and “creditor” by cross-reference to section 702 of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA). ECOA section 702 defines “creditor” as “any person who regularly extends, renews, or continues credit; any person who regularly arranges for the extension, renewal, or continuation of credit; or any assignee of an original creditor who participates in the decision to extend, renew, or continue credit.” 15 U.S.C. 1691a(e). The ECOA defines “credit” as “the right granted by a creditor to a debtor to defer payment of debt or to incur debts and defer its payment or to purchase property or services and defer Start Printed Page 30710payment therefor.” 15 U.S.C. 1691a(d). Thus, the FCRA's red flags provisions have been broadly applied to banks, finance companies, automobile dealers, mortgage brokers, utility companies, and telecommunications companies. 12 CFR 222.90(b)(5).

The scope of the Board's Red Flags rule is set forth in 12 CFR 222.90(a), which states that the Board's rule applies to financial institutions and creditors that are state member banks (other than national banks) and their respective operating subsidiaries, branches and agencies of foreign banks (other than federal branches, federal agencies, and insured state branches of foreign banks), commercial lending companies owned or controlled by foreign banks, and organizations operating under section 25 or 25A of the Federal Reserve Act. Financial institutions and creditors that are not covered by the Board's rule are covered by substantially identical rules issued by other federal agencies.

II. The Red Flag Program Clarification Act of 2010

On December 18, 2010, Congress enacted the Red Flag Program Clarification Act of 2010 (the Clarification Act).[3] The Clarification Act amended section 615(e) of the FCRA (15 U.S.C. 1681m(e)) by adding a definition of the term “creditor” that is specific to section 615(e). The Clarification Act continues to define creditor by cross-reference to the ECOA's definition of creditor, but limits the application of the red flags provisions of the FCRA to only those creditors that regularly and in the ordinary course of business: (a) Obtain or use consumer reports, directly or indirectly, in connection with a credit transaction; (b) furnish information to consumer reporting agencies, as described in FCRA section 623, in connection with a credit transaction; or (c) advance funds to or on behalf of a person, based on an obligation of the person to repay the funds or repayable from specific property pledged by or on behalf of the person. 15 U.S.C. 1681m(e)(4)(A).

The Clarification Act's revised definition excludes, however, those creditors that advance funds on behalf of a person for expenses incidental to a service provided by the creditor to that person. 15 U.S.C. 1681m(e)(4)(B). The legislative intent of narrowing the definition of “creditor” in the Red Flags rule was to exclude from coverage those persons that sell a product or service for which the consumer can pay later, such as lawyers and doctors.[4]

The Clarification Act also grants authority to the Board and the other agencies to determine, through a rulemaking, whether there are other creditors that offer or maintain accounts that are subject to a reasonably foreseeable risk of identity theft that should be subject to the Red Flags rule. 15 U.S.C. 1681m(e)(4)(C). The Board is not using its discretionary rulemaking authority at this time to extend the application of its Red Flags rule to additional creditors.

III. The Board's Proposed Revisions to Regulation V

In February 2014, the Board proposed to amend the definition of “creditor” in Regulation V (12 CFR 222.90) to conform the rule to the definition of “creditor” in the FCRA as amended by the Clarification Act (Proposed Rule).[5] The Board also proposed to update a citation in Supplement A to Appendix J of Regulation V in light of the transfer of rulemaking authority to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The Board received five comments on the Proposed Rule.

IV. The Final Rule

As discussed above, the Board proposed to amend the definition of “creditor” in § 222.90(b)(5) to cross-reference the limited definition of creditor in section 615(e) of the FCRA, which is specific to the statute's red flags provisions. Accordingly, proposed § 222.90(b)(5) provided that “creditor has the same meaning as in 15 U.S.C. 1681m(e)(4).” Commenters unanimously supported the Board's proposal to amend the definition, and the Board is adopting the proposed changes in the final rule.

(Video) Gimme 15 Minutes: Medical Identity Theft and the Red Flags Rule

Under the Clarification Act and the final rule, creditors that do not regularly and in the ordinary course of business: (a) Obtain or use consumer reports in connection with a credit transaction; (b) furnish information to consumer reporting agencies in connection with a credit transaction; or (c) advance funds to or on behalf of a person, are no longer subject to the identity theft red flags requirements. However, the Red Flags rule still covers all financial institutions, regardless of whether they meet the revised definition of creditor.[6] As a result, the revised definition does not affect the scope of the Board's rules, which only apply to state member banks and other financial institutions.

Commenters also supported the proposal to revise Supplement A to Appendix J of Regulation V, which included a cross-reference to the Board's definition of a “notice of address discrepancy” in Regulation V (12 CFR 222.82(b)). Because the Board's rulemaking authority for the notice of address discrepancy provisions of the FCRA (15 U.S.C. 1681c(h)) transferred to the CFPB under the Dodd-Frank Act, the Board proposed to revise the citation in Appendix J so that it cross-references the CFPB's definition of a “notice of address discrepancy” in the CFPB's Regulation V (12 CFR 1022.82(b)).[7] The Board is updating the citation as proposed.

One commenter suggested that the Board make further amendments to Regulation V to repeal provisions for which the rulemaking authority was not retained by the Board after the transfer of authority to the CFPB under the Dodd-Frank Act. The Board intends to make further revisions to Regulation V to reflect changes in its rulemaking authority at a later date.

V. Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

The Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) (RFA) generally requires an agency to perform an assessment of the impact a rule is expected to have on small entities. Based on its analysis, and for the reasons stated below, the Board believes that this final rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities.

1. Statement of the need for, and objectives of, the final rule. As noted above, the Clarification Act amended the definition of “creditor” in the FCRA for purposes of the red flags provisions. The Board is amending the definition of “creditor” in its Red Flags rule to reflect the revised definition of that term in the Clarification Act. As also noted above, the Board is updating a cross-reference in the Red Flags rule to reflect the CFPB's rulemaking authority for the Start Printed Page 30711notice of address discrepancy provisions in the FCRA.

2. Summary of issues raised by comments in response to the initial regulatory flexibility analysis. The Board did not receive any comments on the initial regulatory flexibility analysis.

3. Small entities affected by the final rule. The final rule amends the definition of “creditor” in the Board's Regulation V to conform to the revised definition of that term in the Clarification Act. The definition continues to refer to the FCRA definition of “creditor,” which references the ECOA definition of “creditor,” but limits the application of the red flags provisions to only those creditors that regularly and in the ordinary course of business: (a) Obtain or use consumer reports in connection with a credit transaction; (b) furnish information to consumer reporting agencies in connection with a credit transaction; or (c) advance funds to or on behalf of a person, based on an obligation of the person to repay the funds or repayable from specific property pledged by or on behalf of the person. 15 U.S.C. 1681m(e)(4)(A). However, small entities that are financial institutions are still subject to the requirements, regardless of whether they meet the revised definition of creditor. Consequently, the revisions do not affect the scope of the Board's rules, which only apply to state member banks and other financial institutions, so no small entities are affected.

The final rule also updates a cross-reference in the Red Flags rule to reflect the CFPB's rulemaking authority for the notice of address discrepancy provisions in the FCRA. This revision has no effect on small entities because there is no substantive difference between the Board's definition of a “notice of address discrepancy” and the CFPB's definition.

4. Recordkeeping, reporting, and compliance requirements. The final rule does not impose any new recordkeeping, reporting, or compliance requirements on small entities. Small entities that no longer meet the narrower definition of “creditor” would not have to comply with the requirements of the Red Flags rule. However, small entity financial institutions would still be required to comply with the Red Flags rule, regardless of whether they meet the revised definition of creditor. Thus, the revisions do not affect the scope of the Board's rules, which only apply to state member banks and other financial institutions. In addition, the updated cross-reference in the final rule that reflects the CFPB's rulemaking authority for the notice of address discrepancy provisions in the FCRA is not a substantive change.

5. Significant alternatives to the final revisions. Because the amendments in the final rule will have no impact, there are no significant alternatives that would further minimize the economic impact of the final rule on small entities.

VI. Paperwork Reduction Act

In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506; 5 CFR Part 1320, Appendix A.1), the Board reviewed the rule under the authority delegated to the Federal Reserve by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The final rule contains no requirements subject to the PRA.

Start List of Subjects

  • Banks, banking
  • Consumer protection
  • Safety and soundness, and State member banks

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Authority and Issuance

For the reasons set forth in the preamble, the Board amends Regulation V, 12 CFR part 222, as set forth below:

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1. The authority citation for part 222 continues to read as follows:

(Video) Fighting Fraud And Identity Theft Together With The Red Flags Rule

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Authority: 15 U.S.C. 1681b, 1681c, 1681m and 1681s; Secs. 3, 214, and 216, Pub. L. 108-159, 117 Stat. 1952.

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2. Amend § 222.90 by revising paragraph (b)(5) to read as follows:

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§ 222.90

Duties regarding the detection, prevention, and mitigation of identity theft.

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(b) * * *

(5) Creditor has the same meaning as in 15 U.S.C. 1681m(e)(4).

* * * * *

Start Amendment Part

3. Amend Supplement A to Appendix J by revising example 3. to read as follows:

End Amendment Part

Appendix J to Part 222—Interagency Guidelines on Identity Theft Detection, Prevention, and Mitigation

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(Video) Red Flags Rule - Identity Theft Compliance For Businesses

Supplement A to Appendix J

* * * * *

3. A consumer reporting agency provides a notice of address discrepancy, as defined in 12 CFR 1022.82(b).

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Start Signature

By order of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, May 22, 2014.

Robert deV. Frierson,

Secretary of the Board.

End Signature End Supplemental Information

1.  The other banking agencies included the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency; Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; and Office of Thrift Supervision. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) added the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to the list of agencies with rulemaking and enforcement authority under the Fair Credit Reporting Act with respect to the Red Flags rule. Public Law 111-203, 124 Stat. 1376 (2010).

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2.  72 FR 63718 (Nov. 9, 2007).

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(Video) Federal Trade Commission Red Flags Rule

3.  Public Law 111-319, 124 Stat. 3457 (Dec. 18, 2010).

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4.  156 Cong. Rec. S8289 (daily ed. Nov. 30, 2010) (statement of Sen. Dodd).

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5.  79 FR 9645 (Feb. 20, 2014).

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6.  The Board consulted and coordinated with the other banking agencies, the FTC, the NCUA, the CFTC, and the SEC with respect to the final rule. The FTC issued an interim final rule and the OCC issued a final rule amending the definition of “creditor” in their respective Red Flags rules, consistent with the revised definition in the Clarification Act. 77 FR 72712 (Dec. 6, 2012) (FTC) and 79 FR 28393 (May 16, 2014) (OCC). The CFTC and SEC jointly issued final Red Flags rules and guidelines reflecting the FCRA definition of “creditor” as amended by the Clarification Act. 78 FR 23637 (Apr. 19, 2013). The Board understands that the FDIC and the NCUA will act separately with respect to any necessary updates to each agency's Red Flags rule.

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7.  The Board notes that there is no substantive difference between the Board's definition of a “notice of address discrepancy” and the CFPB's definition.

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[FR Doc. 2014-12358 Filed 5-28-14; 8:45 am]

(Video) FTC Red Flag Rules 30,000 Victims a Day Identity Theft

BILLING CODE 6210-01-P

FAQs

What are the red flags of identity theft? ›

Red Flags are suspicious patterns or practices, or specific activities that indicate the possibility of identity theft. For example, if a customer has to provide some form of identification to open an account with your company, an ID that doesn't look genuine is a “red flag” for your business.

What are the five areas covered in the Red Flags Rule that must be addressed in a bank's Red Flag program? ›

The Five Categories of Red Flags

Warnings, alerts, alarms or notifications from a consumer reporting agency. Suspicious documents. Unusual use of, or suspicious activity related to, a covered account. Suspicious personally identifying information, such as a suspicious inconsistency with a last name or address.

What's the red flag rule? ›

Red-flag laws allow police, family members or even doctors to petition a court to take away someone's firearms for up to a year if they feel that person is a threat to themselves or others.

Who does the red flag rule apply to? ›

The Red Flags Rule requires that each "financial institution" or "creditor"—which includes most securities firms—implement a written program to detect, prevent and mitigate identity theft in connection with the opening or maintenance of "covered accounts." These include consumer accounts that permit multiple payments ...

What are the four elements of the Red Flag Rule? ›

This ITPP addresses 1) identifying relevant identity theft Red Flags for our firm, 2) detecting those Red Flags, 3) responding appropriately to any that are detected to prevent and mitigate identity theft, and 4) updating our ITPP periodically to reflect changes in risks.

How can you tell if you've been red flagged? ›

Related Articles
  • Look into your medical history. ...
  • Go to a reputable pharmacy and ask for a dosage of your regular prescribed medication. ...
  • If the pharmacist denies you the medication, then you are Red Flagged, as they would have to consult an online system that tracks when your next dosage should be given.

What are the top 7 identity theft categories? ›

Here's what to look out for and, most important, what to do if it happens to you.
  • Online Shopping Fraud. ...
  • Social Security Number Identity Theft. ...
  • Senior Identity Theft and Scams. ...
  • Child Identity Theft. ...
  • Tax Identity Theft. ...
  • Biometric ID Theft. ...
  • Synthetic Identity Theft. ...
  • Medical Identity Theft.
29 Sept 2020

How many red flag rules are there? ›

The Red Flags Rule sets out how certain businesses and organizations must develop, implement, and administer their Identity Theft Prevention Programs. The program must include four basic elements, which together create a framework to address the threat of identity theft.

How many possible red flags are there? ›

In order to protect consumers, the US government has identified 5 categories of identity theft red flags and a total of 26 specific red flags as part of the Red Flags Rule regulation to help businesses detect and prevent identity theft in their day to day business operations.

What is a red flag in cyber security? ›

Red Flag - A pattern, practice or specific activity that indicates the possible existence of identity theft. Security Incident - A collection of related activities or events which provide evidence that personal information could have been acquired by an unauthorized person.

Which is a possible consequence for violating the Red Flags Rule? ›

While the FTC does not conduct routine compliance audits, they will perform an audit in response to a complaint. If your company is covered by the Red Flags Rule, non-compliance will result in a financial penalty.

What document S should be signed and attached to an order when identifying a red flag? ›

These include the license to conduct business or in case of a regulated business, registration with the regulatory authority, an IEC in case of import-export business, tax-related registrations and trade licenses etc.

How do you red flag your Social Security number? ›

How to put a flag on your social security number or credit report
  1. Contact one of the three credit reporting agencies (Transunion, Equifax, or Experian). ...
  2. After a few days, check with the other two credit bureaus to verify that they've received the fraud alert as well.
14 Mar 2022

What are the 10 red flag symptoms? ›

What are the Top 'Red Flags' or Warning Signs?
  • Chest Pain: Chest pain is a concerning symptom because it is an important indication of a heart attack. ...
  • Loss of Consciousness: ...
  • Shortness of Breath: ...
  • Unusual Bleeding: ...
  • Unexplained Weight Loss: ...
  • Thunderclap Headache: ...
  • High or Persistent Fever: ...
  • Symptoms of Stroke:
5 May 2017

What are red flag questions? ›

If Your Partner Can't Answer Any Of These 13 Questions, It's A Red Flag
  • "How Did Your Last Relationship End?"
  • "Can We Talk About Our Health Histories?"
  • "Can You See Us Ever Moving In Together?"
  • "Do You Want To Get Married?"
  • “Can You Tell Me What's Going Wrong?”
  • "How Do You Define Trust?"
  • "What Really Scares You?"
7 Aug 2017

Which might be considered a potential red flag on a controlled substance? ›

Pharmacists can look for “red flags”

Forged prescriptions (e.g. lack of common abbreviations or overly legible handwriting) Prescriptions originating from outside the immediate geographic area. Altered prescriptions (e.g. multiple ink colors or handwriting styles) Cash payments.

What are the three most common acts of identity theft? ›

The three most common types of identity theft are financial, medical and online.

What are the 5 most common types of identity theft? ›

Here are five common types of identity theft to help you stay one step ahead of hackers.
  • Financial identity theft.
  • Medical identity theft.
  • Criminal identity theft.
  • Synthetic identity theft.
  • Child identity theft.
15 Jul 2022

What are the four most common methods of identity theft? ›

The four types of identity theft include medical, criminal, financial and child identity theft. Medical identity theft occurs when individuals identify themselves as another to procure free medical care.

What is a red flag for suspicious personal identifying information? ›

A “red flag” means a pattern, practice or specific activity that indicates the possible existence of a fraud being committed or attempted using the personal identifying information of another person without authorization.

Which of the following are examples of red flags? ›

  • EXAMPLES OF RED FLAG INDICATORS.
  • 1) Suspicious Documents:
  • 2) Suspicious Personal ID Information:
  • 3) Suspicious Activity:
  • 4) Suspicious Medical Information:
  • 5) Alerts from others, such as:

What are examples of the red flags cybercriminals use in phishing attempts? ›

Here are the 7 biggest red flags you should check for when you receive an email or text.
  • 1 Urgent or threatening language. ...
  • 2 Requests for sensitive information. ...
  • 3 Anything too good to be true. ...
  • 4 Unexpected emails. ...
  • 5 Information mismatches. ...
  • 6 Suspicious attachments. ...
  • 7 Unprofessional design.
31 Mar 2022

What are Red Flag emails? ›

An email containing missing tenses, transposed words, or over generalities, should be a red flag. You will rarely send an email without the inclusion of a name, company, or specific subject, especially in a business context.

Which of the following is a red flag that a message might be a phishing attempt? ›

Sense of urgency or threatening language. Unfamiliar or unusual senders or recipients. Spelling or grammar errors. Request for money or personal information.

Which regulatory authorities enforces the Red Flags Rule? ›

Red Flags Rule | Federal Trade Commission.

What is a red flags Risk Assessment? ›

16 CFR 603.2) 6. A “red flag” is a pattern, practice or specific activity that indicates the possible existence of identity theft. 1 For purposes of these examination procedures, “financial institutions and creditors” are referred to jointly as. “financial institutions.”

What are some red flags that you might discover during due diligence? ›

Red Flags in Transaction Due Diligence
  • The same or similar entity name or address is found on any of the U.S. government watchlists. ...
  • Use of webmail email addresses, rather than a business email address.
  • No company website.
  • Multiple companies or entities listed at the same address.
  • Recent company name changes or relocation.
27 Oct 2020

What are the first signs of identity theft? ›

9 Signs of Identity Theft
  • Unexplained charges or withdrawals. ...
  • Medical bills for doctors you haven't visited. ...
  • New credit cards you didn't apply for. ...
  • Errors on your credit report. ...
  • Collection notices or calls for unknown debt. ...
  • Your credit card or application for credit is denied. ...
  • Missing mail or email.

What are 7 key signs that you have been a victim of identity theft? ›

Beware of These 7 Signs of Identity Theft
  • Unexplained transactions on your credit and bank accounts. ...
  • Your credit card is declined. ...
  • You're flooded with calls or notices from debt collectors. ...
  • You're denied for new credit. ...
  • There's new information on your credit report that you don't recognize.
22 Dec 2021

What are signs that your identity has been stolen? ›

Here's How To Know If Your Identity Has Been Stolen
  • Your credit report doesn't seem accurate.
  • Suspicious activity on your credit card and bank statements.
  • Unexpected physical mail.
  • Missing physical mail.
  • Identification documents are lost (or stolen)
  • Suspicious phone calls and voicemails.
  • Suspicious emails and text messages.

How can you tell if someone is stealing your identity? ›

How To Know if Someone Stole Your Identity
  1. Track what bills you owe and when they're due. If you stop getting a bill, that could be a sign that someone changed your billing address.
  2. Review your bills. ...
  3. Check your bank account statement. ...
  4. Get and review your credit reports.

How can I find out if my Social Security is being used? ›

If you believe someone is using your Social Security number to work, get your tax refund, or other abuses involving taxes, contact the IRS online or call 1-800-908-4490. You can order free credit reports annually from the three major credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion).

How do you know if one's identity is being used without one's knowledge? ›

Monitor Your Identity. Check your credit report regularly for any signs that someone might have stolen your identity. You can review your report for signs of suspicious activity, such as accounts that you don't recognise or credit checks from companies with which you've never done business.

How do I know if someone opened a credit card in my name? ›

The best way to find out if someone has opened an account in your name is to pull your own credit reports to check. Note that you'll need to pull your credit reports from all three bureaus — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion — to check for fraud since each report may have different information and reporting.

Why would someone open a debit card in my name? ›

This person may be the actual fraudster or someone the criminal has manipulated into acting as a front for the fraud. The accounts are then used to either launder money or commit future fraud. Criminals use stolen credentials and personal data to open accounts in the names of individuals without their knowledge.

Can someone open a bank account in my name? ›

They generally require one form of identity proof and one form of address proof. Your identity can be proven with a passport, driving licence, birth certificate, benefit book, national insurance number card or any other official document which bears your name.

What are 3 things you should do to help keep your identity safe? ›

The Top 10 Ways to Protect Your Identity
  • Keep your mail safe. ...
  • Read your account statements. ...
  • Check your credit reports. ...
  • Shred! ...
  • Store personal documents at home. ...
  • Be wary of unknown phone calls and emails. ...
  • Create difficult logins and passwords. ...
  • Use one credit card for online shopping.

What is the most common form of identity theft? ›

Financial identity theft.

This is the most common form of identity theft — when someone uses another person's information for financial gain.

What are the four types of identity theft? ›

The four types of identity theft include medical, criminal, financial and child identity theft. Medical identity theft occurs when individuals identify themselves as another to procure free medical care.

Do identity thieves get caught? ›

5. Are identity thieves ever caught? Identity theft statistics for 2020 are not available yet; however, 2006 research showed that federal authorities arrest only 0.14% of the criminals (one person in 700 identity theft suspects).

What can you do if someone opens an account in your name? ›

Help! A Family Member Opened a Credit Card In My Name
  1. Decide if you want to confront the family member.
  2. Call the credit card issuer and cancel the account.
  3. Gather any evidence of financial fraud.
  4. Report the identity theft to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
  5. File a police report with local law enforcement.
13 Apr 2022

What do I do if my personal information has been compromised? ›

7 Steps to take after your personal data is compromised online
  1. Change your passwords. ...
  2. Sign up for two-factor authentication. ...
  3. Check for updates from the company. ...
  4. Watch your accounts, check your credit reports. ...
  5. Consider identity theft protection services. ...
  6. Freeze your credit. ...
  7. Go to IdentityTheft.gov.

How do you put an alert on your Social Security number? ›

Protect yourself from identity theft

You may reach the FTC's identity theft hotline toll free at 1-877-IDTHEFT (1-877-438-4338) or visit their website at www.ftc.gov/idtheft. Additional Resources: Protecting Your Social Security Number from Identity Theft.

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